Lost Horizon

Lost Horizon

DVD - 1999
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Fleeing war-torn China, a small planeload of people are hijacked to an idyllic valley in the Himalayas where time has virtually stopped. There Conway, a British diplomat, falls in love with a beautiful woman, and is asked to remain in Shangri-La as its new leader.
Publisher: Culver City, CA : Columbia TriStar Home Video, [1999]
Edition: Full screen version
ISBN: 9780767821414
0767821416
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (ca. 134 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in
Alternative Title: Frank Capra's lost horizon

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p
patch666
Oct 12, 2017

Classic !!!!!

r
robertg58
Jul 27, 2017

I don't know how many times I have seen Lost Horizon in my lifetime,
It is every pesons dream of how the world should be and not how it is.
For a few moments we can enjoy our dream.

l
lindy919
Nov 29, 2016

Hated it. I could not wait for it to be over!

The overacting brother; the shrieking blond woman; the weasel paleontologist - I wanted to scream. And then the main crux of the plot - 2 hours to get the protagonist to agree to stay to be the next leader and builder of the community and then POOF, he decides to leave based on the illogical minor character, Maria, who really is 90 years old but wants to leave Shangri La (an utopia where everyone is happy and cared for, wants for nothing, and lives a long healthy life) for some reasons that are never revealed. But wait, it all works out in the end because after the sherpa guides leave him for dead, he manages to get back to the place where he wanted to stay but decided to leave. WTF?

h
hoacornell
Dec 28, 2014

A masterpiece of film making by Director Frank Capra. Ronald Colman is superb as a British Diplomat who falls in love with Jane Wyman after his plane crashes in the Himalayas. I won't ruin the story for you, it is too good for that. Capra worked with a great cast and script. The location shots of China and Shangri-La are beautiful. It is a remarkable film that the UCLA Film School restored so the world would not be denied this wonderful film.

n
Nursebob
Dec 19, 2014

Frank Capra’s classic tale of a snowbound Utopia may seem a bit trite by today’s cynical standards yet it’s vision of a kinder, gentler society should make us all the more fed up with the status quo. It’s China, 1935, and a violent military action is putting foreigners in peril; enter Robert Conway, dashing diplomat and England’s “Man of the East”. Surrounded by thousands of hysterical Asian extras Conway gathers up the last few Caucasians left in a remote village and whisks them away to Shanghai. Unfortunately their small plane is hijacked en route by a mysterious Mongol pilot and eventually crashes into a Himalayan mountainside where Conway and company are rescued by a group of fur-clad natives who take them to the mystical monastery of Shangri-La. Protected from the outside world by a ring of imposing mountains Shangri-La is a semi-tropical paradise where the happy citizens follow a strict code of unwavering pacifism. “Be Kind” is the only motto here and before long the troupe are completely seduced by the valley’s hypnotic blend of peace and idyllic splendour. But their visit is not entirely accidental as Conway discovers when he is summoned to speak with the saintlike High Lama (character actor Sam Jaffe looking like a mummified Phantom of the Opera). Apparently the people who run Shangri-La have some grandiose plans for the world at large and Conway is to play a critical role in bringing them to fruition. Released just as WWII was gathering on the horizon it is easy to appreciate the film’s call for non-violence even though the American Military added some anti-Japanese propaganda to the opening scenes which were thankfully removed for this restored version. The plane passengers themselves provide a small cross-section of greater society’s ills from the skeptical scientist and oily conman to the weary prostitute and George, Conway’s brother, who ends up being the proverbial snake in Eden. Groundbreaking for the time, the cinematography and Oscar-winning set design use refrigerated sound stages, rear projection and life-sized plane models for realism while the clever use of miniatures and stage lighting adds a touch of magic. A pipe dream perhaps, but produced with a great deal of flair and intelligence.

t
trimix
Sep 24, 2014

This is hands down one of the best movies I have ever seen. Lost Horizon is one a timeless movies like Casablanca, Ben Hur, The Black Rose and Moses. It has romance, adventure, mystery and exotic settings (OK, they filmed the whole thing in a vacant lot and a sound stage, but they had me convinced). This film will be enjoyed by men and women. Even though the subject matter is very adult, I would let my 9 year old niece watch this film without hesitation.

aaa5756 Aug 26, 2014

One of the best films I have seen in this year. It was entertaining and interesting. Great performances a must see for all. Truly a really great movie worth the long library wait or the price to rent from a Red Box. Well worth the price of admission to any theater.

f
Fuzzy_Wuzzy
Aug 23, 2014

Favorite movie quote - "There are moments in every man's life when he glimpses the eternal."

Welcome to Shangri-La, a Utopian paradise where everyone adheres to one, simple rule - Be kind.

In spite of its glaring flaws and ludicrous improbabilities, 1937's Lost Horizon, in the long run, was (surprisingly enough) quite a thoughtful movie in many ways.

Even though it preached of serene happiness, the virtues of avoiding excesses, and the basic principles of Christianity, its earnest message seemed both sincere and genuine.

Usually films which include obvious undertones of Christianity as the basis of their story don't go over very well with me. But, I found Lost Horizon to be something of an exception to the rule.

With Lost Horizon now being 77 years old, one must make a point of keeping its time-frame firmly in mind in order to get any worthwhile entertainment value out of this vintage production.

One of Lost Horizon's most notable performances was that of Ronald Coleman who played the Robert Conway character.

This is definitely one of those films that one must experience for themselves in order to make a fair and honest judgement of its content.

d2013 Jun 14, 2014

Still a gem of a movie after all these years!

g
garycornell
Jun 03, 2014

We would not be so lucky to have a copy of Director Frank Capra's "Lost Horizon" if UCLA film school had not restored the only copy they could find. The school could not find a complete movie, so they have a short part of the film that freezes on the last frame and the soundtrack continues. Once they reach where they have again both film and soundtrack, they resume the movie. Ronald Colman stars in what might be considered one of his best films. Certainly "Lost Horizon" will always be considered one of the best Capra films. UCLA film school has saved a number of classic films and I feel we owe them our appreciation on job well done.
P.S. KCLS has 3 copies and at the moment all 3 copies are available. Now would be a great time to see an all time classic American film.

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m
Monolith
Dec 21, 2012

Robert Conway: "By the way, what religion do you follow here?" Chang: "To put it simply, I should say that our general belief was in, uh, moderation. We preach the virtue... of avoiding excesses of every kind. Even including... excessive virtue itself." Robert Conway: "Well that's intelligent." Chang: "We find in the valley it makes for greater happiness among the natives. We rule... with moderate strictness, and in return we are satisfied with moderate obedience. As a result, our people are... moderately honest, moderately, uh, chaste, and um, somewhat more than moderately happy."

m
Monolith
Dec 21, 2012

Robert Conway: "...How 'bout law...and order -- you have no soldiers or police?" Chang: "Ho, ho, ho... Oh good heavens, no." Robert Conway: "How do you deal with incorrigibles... Criminals?" Chang: "We have no crime here... What makes a criminal? Lack, usually. A voraciousness... Envy. The desire... to possess, something owned by another. There can be no crime where there is a sufficiency of everything."

m
Monolith
Dec 21, 2012

Chang: "...It is quite common here to live to a very ripe old age. Climate, diet -- the mountain water you might say. But we like to believe it is the absence of struggle in the way we live. In your countries, on the other hand, how often do you hear the expression, "He worried himself to death", or "This thing or that killed him". Robert Conway: "Oh, very often." Chang: "And very true. Your lives are therefore, as a rule, shorter. Not so much by natural death, as by... indirect suicide."

m
Monolith
Dec 21, 2012

High Lama (to Robert Conway): "...It is the entire meaning and purpose of Shangri-La. It came to me in a vision, long, long ago. I saw all the nations strengthening, not in wisdom, but in the vulgar passions and the will to destroy. I saw the machine power multiplying, until a single weaponed man might match a whole army. I foresaw a time when man, exalting in the technique of murder, would rage so hotly over the world, that every book, every treasure, would be doomed to destruction. This vision was so vivid and so moving, that I determined to gather together all things of beauty and of culture that I could, and preserve them here, against the doom toward which the world is rushing." (cont'd)

m
Monolith
Dec 21, 2012

High Lama: "Look at the world today -- Is there anything more pitiful? What madness there is! What blindness! What unintelligent leadership! A scurrying mass of bewildered humanity, crashing headlong against each other, propelled by an orgy of greed and brutality. A time must come my friend, when this orgy will spend itself. When brutality and the lust for power must perish by its own sword. Against that time, is why I avoided death, and am here. And why you were brought here. For when that day comes, the world must begin to look for a new life. And it is our hope that they may find it here. For here, we shall be with their books and their music, and a way of life based on one simple rule: Be Kind! When that day comes, it is our hope that the brotherly love of Shangri-La will spread throughout the world. Yes, my son; When the strong have devoured each other, the Christian ethic may at last be fulfilled, and the meek shall inherit the Earth." Robert Conway: "I understand you father."

m
Monolith
Dec 21, 2012

Robert Conway: "Chang... how old... are you?" Chang: "Age is a limit we impose upon ourselves. You know, each time you Westerners celebrate your birthday, you... build another fence around your minds."

m
Monolith
Dec 21, 2012

Robert Conway (of the High Lama): "...He died... as peacefully as the passing of a cloud's shadow..."

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