Veil of Lies

Veil of Lies

A Medieval Noir

Book - 2008
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Baker & Taylor
Stripped of his rank and honor for plotting against Richard II, disgraced knight Crispin Guest uses his wits to eke out a living in fourteenth-century London, taking on an investigation on behalf of a reclusive merchant that draws him into the middle of a complex conspiracy involving dark secrets, international plots, a missing religious relic, and murder. A first novel. 10,000 first printing.

McMillan Palgrave
"A great read, through and through. Westerson's finely wrought portrait of gritty Medieval London is embued with great wit and poignancy. Crispin Guest is a knight to remember." -- Cornelia Read, author of A Field of Darkness, on Veil of Lies.
Crispin Guest is a disgraced knight, stripped of his rank and his honor - but left with his life - for plotting against Richard II. Having lost his bethrothed, his friends, his patrons and his position in society. With no trade to support him and no family willing to acknowledge him, Crispin has turned to the one thing he still has - his wits - to scrape a living together on the mean streets of London. In 1383, Guest is called to the compound of a merchant - a reclusive mercer who suspects that his wife is being unfaithful and wants Guest to look into the matter. Not wishing to sully himself in such disgraceful, dishonorable business but in dire need of money, Guest agrees and discovers that the wife is indeed up to something, presumably nothing good. But when he comes to inform his client, he is found dead - murdered in a sealed room, locked from the inside. Now Guest has come to the unwanted attention of the Lord Sheriff of London and most recent client was murdered while he was working for him. And everything seems to turn on a religious relic - a veil reported to have wiped the brow of Christ - that is now missing.

In the late 14th Century, disgraced former knight Crispin Guest finds himself in the midst of a situation involving a murdered tradesman, a missing religious artifact, a family dispute and a perplexing mystery.


Blackwell North Amer
In late fourteenth-century England, Crispin Guest is a man adrift in a culture where position is rigidly defined. Guest - once a knight, a member of the upper tiers of society - was convicted of treason and stripped of his rank and his honor for plotting against King Richard II. Having lost his patron, his friends, his betrothed, and his position at court, and with no trade to support him and no family willing to acknowledge him, Crispin has turned to the one thing he still has - his wits - to scrape out a living on the mean streets of London.
In 1384, Crispin is called to the compound of a successful but reclusive cloth merchant who suspects his wife of infidelity and wants Crispin to look into the matter. In dire need of money, Crispin reluctantly agrees and discovers that the wife is indeed up to something. But when he comes to inform his client, he finds the merchant dead - clearly murdered - in a sealed room, locked from the inside. Now Crispin has come to the unwanted attention of the Lord Sheriff of London and finds himself in the middle of a complex plot involving dark secrets, international intrigue, and a missing religious relic - one that lies at the very heart of this heinous and impossible crime.

Baker
& Taylor

Stripped of his rank and honor for plotting against Richard II, disgraced knight Crispin Guest uses his wits to eke out a living in fourteenth-century London, taking on an investigation on behalf of a reclusive merchant that draws him into the middle of a complex conspiracy.

Publisher: New York : St. Martin's Minotaur, 2008
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780312379773
0312379773
Characteristics: viii, 280 p. ; 22 cm

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CRRL_MegRaymond Feb 13, 2018

Crispin Guest has been stripped of his knighthood, his honor, and his place in society. He must now live by his wits.

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blueroo276
Jan 18, 2018

I felt that I *should* have liked this book, but I didn't. Far too "gritty," and no characters that I particularly liked. There are many more pleasant historical mystery series out there.

harrybrowne Aug 19, 2015

This entire series (and I have read them all) is outstanding. Westerson writes cleanly and simply, and she knows her history. Crispin Guest is a likeable and sympathetic character, with a touch of humor that helps get through the sometimes gruesome stories of 14th century London. Highly recommended.

bookfanatic1979 Sep 24, 2012

Hardboiled detective fiction meets locked room puzzle meets medieval mystery. I’ll have to see what the next book is about before I commit to this series.

a
andreareads
Nov 21, 2011

This book is billed as "Medieval Noir" and I'm afraid while I liked the Medieval I wasn't so keen on the Noir. The author has obviously done her research on 14th century London and describes the setting well. The characters and their actions, on the other hand, didn't always ring true to me. I didn't find the tough guy detective particularly likable and wondered how he managed to keep from starving given how picky he was about what jobs he would take. I could have done with a bit less of people getting slapped, punched, beaten up and nearly killed, too, but maybe that's just me . . .

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andreareads
Nov 21, 2011

In this family . . . old hurts are never set aside. They are simply stored for future use.

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